High LTV Multifamily Loans

HUD 221(d)(4) Loan Appraisals: What You Need to Know

HUD 221(d)(4) Loan Appraisals: What You Need to Know

One of the most important of the third-party reports required in the HUD 221(d)(4) application process is the appraisal, during which a qualified property appraiser will examine the development project to determine it's potential value, income, and profitability. This information has been taken directly from the HUD Multifamily Summary Appraisal Report

What are the Pros and Cons of HUD 221(d)(4) Loans?

What are the Pros and Cons of HUD 221(d)(4) Loans?

What are the pros and cons of HUD 221(d)(4) loans? It's a great question, since these HUD multifamily construction loans are incredibly attractive to a variety of developers and investors. 

LTV: Loan-to-Value Ratio in Relation to HUD 221(d)(4) Loans

LTV: Loan-to-Value Ratio in Relation to HUD 221(d)(4) Loans

Loan-to-value ratio (or LTV) is an assessment of risk that lenders use to determine the viability of a loan. Loans with higher LTVs are considered riskier, and therefore often have higher interest rates. Lenders believe that borrowers who have loans with higher LTVs have a greater likelihood of defaulting on their mortgages because of the lack of equity within the property. However, a higher LTV allowance means that investors and developers can get a sizable loan with less cash down. 

MIP: Mortgage Insurance Premiums in Relation to HUD 221(d)(4) Loans

MIP: Mortgage Insurance Premiums in Relation to HUD 221(d)(4) Loans

Just like a borrower who takes out a private real estate loan has to pay private mortgage insurance (PMI), a developer who takes out an FHA multifamily construction loan has to pay a mortgage insurance premium (MIP). While the FHA doesn't make a profit on its loans, it still has to protect itself against unforeseen losses, such as a borrower defaulting on their mortgage. 

BSPRA: Builder Sponsor Profit & Risk Allowance in Relation to HUD 221(d)(4) Loans

BSPRA: Builder Sponsor Profit & Risk Allowance in Relation to HUD 221(d)(4) Loans

BSPRA, or Builder Sponsor Profit & Risk Allowance, is an additional 10% FHA 221(d)(4) loan credit, sometimes referred to as "paper equity," that can be added to the calculated replacement cost of the property. Specifically, BSPRA is calculated by taking 10% of the "hard costs" of the project, which does not including the land, and adding that to the total development costs.

LTC: Loan-to-Cost Ratio in Relation to HUD 221(d)(4) Loans

LTC: Loan-to-Cost Ratio in Relation to HUD 221(d)(4) Loans

When looking at traditional, single-family residential loans, loan-to-value ratio (LTV) is often one of the most important factors to examine. However, when we look at HUD multifamily construction loans, like the HUD 221(d)(4) loan, and other similar types of financing, loan-to-cost ratio (LTC) also becomes an important factor.