FHA Multifamily Loans

What are the Benefits of Non-Recourse Loans?

What are the Benefits of Non-Recourse Loans?

One of the biggest benefits of HUD 221(d)(4) loans for developers is the fact that they are non-recourse-- i.e., the lender cannot seize a borrower's personal property if they default on the loan. Instead, HUD multifamily construction loans are secured by collateral; in this case, the building and the property itself, which can be seized if the borrower defaults. 

CNA: Capital Needs Assessment in Relation to HUD 221(d)(4) Loans

CNA: Capital Needs Assessment in Relation to HUD 221(d)(4) Loans

A Capital Needs Assessment (CNA), sometimes referred to as a Physical Needs Assessment (PNA) is a type of report that can help owners and developers understand how much it will cost to maintain their project over time. That way, owner/developers, lenders, and property management can work together to develop a smart budget, and can also create estimates of the life of various systems in the building (i.e. plumbing, electrical, insulation, etc.)

Can You Refinance a HUD 221(d)(4) Loan?

Can You Refinance a HUD 221(d)(4) Loan?

If you get a HUD 221(d)(4) loan to create a multifamily development, can you refinance that loan later? The answer is yes, and you can do use the HUD 223(a)(7) program to do so. The program, which is designed specifically for current HUD multifamily and healthcare borrowers to refinance their projects, offers some pretty amazing terms. 

Developer Fees for HUD 221(d)(4) Loans

Developer Fees for HUD 221(d)(4) Loans

When it comes to developer fees for HUD 221(d)(4) projects, eligibility can vary significantly from project to project. Affordable developments, as well as those using the LIHTC program, can often qualify for a developer fee. Typically, these developer fees can be anywhere between 10 and 15% of the eligible project costs.

Green MIP Reduction for HUD 221(d)(4) Loans

Green MIP Reduction for HUD 221(d)(4) Loans

While FHA MIP is usually less expensive than the private mortgage insurance one would pay on a privately-insured loan, it can still get expensive. Fortunately, HUD is now allowing investors and developers to reduce their MIP payments to 0.25%, provided they make energy efficient improvements to their project. 

Where do I find a HUD Multifamily Center?

Where do I find a HUD Multifamily Center?

If you're interested in getting a HUD 221(d)(4) loan, you'll likely have to do a lot of communication with your local HUD multifamily center. While your lender may do much of the coordination and communication with you (and/or for you), it may still important to for you to reach out your local HUD multifamily center with questions or concerns about the HUD multifamily construction loan process. 

Large HUD 221(d)(4) Loans: What You Need to Know

Large HUD 221(d)(4) Loans: What You Need to Know

While we mentioned in the loan facts section of this website that the minimum HUD 221(d)(4) loan is $2 million, and there is no upper limit, the reality can be a little bit more complex. While there technically is no financial ceiling for the program, particularly large loans are typically subject to stricter requirements, especially those involving DSCR and LTC

What are the Pros and Cons of HUD 221(d)(4) Loans?

What are the Pros and Cons of HUD 221(d)(4) Loans?

What are the pros and cons of HUD 221(d)(4) loans? It's a great question, since these HUD multifamily construction loans are incredibly attractive to a variety of developers and investors. 

LIHTC: Low-Income Housing Tax Credits in Relation to HUD 221(d)(4) Loans

LIHTC: Low-Income Housing Tax Credits in Relation to HUD 221(d)(4) Loans

The Low-Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) program, sometimes referred to as section 42, is a government initiative that encourages private investors to finance housing for low-income families and individuals. To do this, the LIHTC program provides an indirect federal subsidy in the form of a tax credit that a developer or investor can claim on their income tax return. 

MIP: Mortgage Insurance Premiums in Relation to HUD 221(d)(4) Loans

MIP: Mortgage Insurance Premiums in Relation to HUD 221(d)(4) Loans

Just like a borrower who takes out a private real estate loan has to pay private mortgage insurance (PMI), a developer who takes out an FHA multifamily construction loan has to pay a mortgage insurance premium (MIP). While the FHA doesn't make a profit on its loans, it still has to protect itself against unforeseen losses, such as a borrower defaulting on their mortgage. 

LTV: Loan-to-Value Ratio in Relation to HUD 221(d)(4) Loans

LTV: Loan-to-Value Ratio in Relation to HUD 221(d)(4) Loans

Loan-to-value ratio (or LTV) is an assessment of risk that lenders use to determine the viability of a loan. Loans with higher LTVs are considered riskier, and therefore often have higher interest rates. Lenders believe that borrowers who have loans with higher LTVs have a greater likelihood of defaulting on their mortgages because of the lack of equity within the property. However, a higher LTV allowance means that investors and developers can get a sizable loan with less cash down. 

What is the Federal Housing Administration's (FHA) Role in Multifamily Debt?

What is the Federal Housing Administration's (FHA) Role in Multifamily Debt?

The Federal Housing Administration (FHA), founded in 1934, is a U.S. government agency under the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). The main purpose of the FHA is to insure residential real estate loans. While many of the FHA's loans focus on individual homebuyers, the FHA also provides loans for multifamily builders and developers, including it's popular HUD 221(d)(4) loan program. 

DSCR: Debt Service Coverage Ratio in Relation to HUD 221(d)(4) Loans

DSCR: Debt Service Coverage Ratio in Relation to HUD 221(d)(4) Loans

When deciding whether to issue a loan to a borrower, one of the most important aspects a lender looks at is DSCR, or Debt Service Coverage Ratio. DSCR is a measurement of annual cash flow vs. annual debt obligations.

BSPRA: Builder Sponsor Profit & Risk Allowance in Relation to HUD 221(d)(4) Loans

BSPRA: Builder Sponsor Profit & Risk Allowance in Relation to HUD 221(d)(4) Loans

BSPRA, or Builder Sponsor Profit & Risk Allowance, is an additional 10% FHA 221(d)(4) loan credit, sometimes referred to as "paper equity," that can be added to the calculated replacement cost of the property. Specifically, BSPRA is calculated by taking 10% of the "hard costs" of the project, which does not including the land, and adding that to the total development costs.

LTC: Loan-to-Cost Ratio in Relation to HUD 221(d)(4) Loans

LTC: Loan-to-Cost Ratio in Relation to HUD 221(d)(4) Loans

When looking at traditional, single-family residential loans, loan-to-value ratio (LTV) is often one of the most important factors to examine. However, when we look at HUD multifamily construction loans, like the HUD 221(d)(4) loan, and other similar types of financing, loan-to-cost ratio (LTC) also becomes an important factor.

Are HUD 221(d)(4) Loans Available for Age-Restricted Communities?

Are HUD 221(d)(4) Loans Available for Age-Restricted Communities?

If you're considering getting an FHA multifamily construction loan to build an age-restricted or senior community, it's important to understand what this type of loan does and does not allow. First, let's define "senior community"-- in the eyes of FHA/HUD, that means any community for individuals 62 years and older. 

What is the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development's (HUD) Role in Multifamily Loans?

What is the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development's (HUD) Role in Multifamily Loans?

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, otherwise known as HUD, is a U.S. government agency intended to make it easier for Americans to find housing at an affordable rate. Founded in 1965, the agency incorporated the Federal Housing Administration (founded in 1934) as one of it's sub-agencies.

Does FHA multifamily construction financing place limits on rehabilitation work?

Does FHA multifamily construction financing place limits on rehabilitation work?

If you're considering applying for a FHA/HUD 221(d)(4) loan to rehabilitate a multifamily property, it's important to realize that there minimum FHA/HUD multifamily project size limits that must be met. Otherwise, the project won't be considered large enough to be eligible for the loan. 

How long does it take for an HUD 221(D)(4) application to be approved?

How long does it take for an HUD 221(D)(4) application to be approved?

Just how long does it take to process an HUD 221(d)(4) loan? That depends. For a MAP one-stage application, the process will take about 5-7 months, whereas, for a MAP two-stage application, the process is more likely to take around 8-10 months. 

Do FHA/HUD 221(d)(4) loans allow for commercial development?

Do FHA/HUD 221(d)(4) loans allow for commercial development?

In today's market, many real estate developers want to mix both residential and commercial development into the same project-- for example, a multi-story residential apartment building, with a ground floor zoned for shops and restaurants. FHA/HUD 221(d)(4) loans can allow a developer to do this-- but only in specific situations.